Details

Project TitleCANCER CELL DEATH INDUCED BY ONCOGENE PROMOTER SEQUENCES (08040)
Track Code08040
Short Description
Abstract

CANCER CELL DEATH INDUCED BY ONCOGENE PROMOTER SEQUENCES (08040)

Features and Benefits

  • Potential new target for anticancer therapeutic
  • Furthered understanding of oncogene regulation through g-quadraplex forming sequences
  • Proven growth inhibition of cancer cells and induction of apoptosis

 *This Technology is available for licensing, further development, or industrial partnering*


Market Opportunities

This technology could be developed into an anticancer therapeutic by inducing apoptosis in cancerous cells. It also has the ability to be used as an agent to stop or limit tumor growth because the oligonucleotides were shown to induce growth inhibition. This is a novel discovery which could allow cancer patients more time and also allow doctors to develop further alternatives in some of the more chronic cases. These oligonucleotides also have shown a potential therapeutic target for new cancer treatments. The information that these compounds have revealed about the regulation of oncogenes could lead to a new therapeutic that can bind to mutated genes and arrest cancer cells. Or, because of the protein binding activity of these compounds, they could be tagged and used for imaging and early detection of cancer.

     Technology  

Many of the genes that are responsible for cell growth and proliferation, called oncogenes, have been linked to cancer after they are damaged or mutate. These include, but are not limited to, c-myc, BCL-1, K-ras, Rb,a dn H1F1-alpha. These genes contain a quadraplex forming sequence that may be responsible for transcription regulation. Therefore, thus structure provides a target for halting cancerous cell growth. Oligonucleotides have the capacity to bind to these forming sequences which causes S-cell phase arrest and was shown to inhibit cell growth and leukemia cells. This technology consists of oligonucleotides containing these quadraplex forming sequences that should be able to inhibit cancer growth. They can readily be synthesized in house and are very stable in the blood stream, with a half-life of about three weeks. These oligonucleotides could be an effective treatment for cancer when other methods have failed.

Technology Status

·         IP Status: Patent US20110213019A1

·         Fields of Use Available: All

·         Development Status: Fully developed

    

Researchers:

  • Dr. Donald Miller

  •  Shelia Thomas
  •  Kara Sedoris
 
Tagsoncology
 
Posted DateApr 13, 2017 2:09 PM